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Career advice

Hello,

    I was hoping if someone could give me some help or advice on finding a job. I currently work as an assistant pathologist at a local laboratory. I’m non-certified, and have learned by on-the-job training under an experienced pathologist for the past 3 years. Since I am not certified, I only work on "minor" specimens, while leaving the more complex ones for the pathologists to do. My eventual goal is to attend assistant pathology school, but until I get there, I want to learn as much as I can, building my experience and knowledge while I wait. To be accepted into the PA program, all schools require a BS degree, which I don’t have. I am 32, and have a BA degree in Philosophy and I am 1 year short of my BS in biology, but out of frustration at the educational system for undergraduate school. I quit my BS program and have not been to school for the past year. I know it might seem easier to just go back to school and finish my last year, but I don’t want spend more money just to sit in classes and be bored learning what will have little bearing on what I truly want to do. I now focus on my work, and I am serious about it to the point where I study anatomy and pathology in my spare time if you can believe that. I am hoping that my work experience at the lab combined with my prior degree and desire will suffice for the lack of a BS degree. My problem is that at my current job, I have "hit the wall" in terms of the learning curve, and I am looking to expand my horizons. The lab I work at rarely does autopsies, and this is where I want to move on to, so, I am looking for a job as an autopsy assistant. I am single and have no children, and would be willing to move anywhere in the country, from Washington to Florida, from Maine to California, just to have a job as one. I can pick and move in a few weeks notice. Money is not important (as long as I can eat and have a roof over my head in a fairly safe neighborhood), but gaining experience is. As you can see, my desire and determination are quite strong, but I know the jobs are few. I was wondering if anyone perhaps knows of any positions available where a non-certified applicant would be considered, or if anyone could give me any advice regarding my situation, and perhaps my next step. Thanks in advance,

Ed

.
posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (13)

13 Responses to “Career advice”

  1. admin says:

    What is an "assistant pathologist?"  Do you mean "pathology
    assistant????"  There’s a world of difference.  A pathologist is an
    M.D., last time I checked.  Pathology assistants used to be called
    "dieners."  Are they still called that?

    Just off the top of my head, without a degree, depending upon the
    complexity of what you are doing for the pathologist you’re working
    with, would it be a problem to insure you for liability?  If it would
    be, and I don’t know this as I don’t work in that part of the lab, then
    that could be a major problem.

    My sister-in-law is currently enrolled in PA school.  She is a former
    registered ASCP medical technologist.  The number of applicants at her
    school was so high that she literally had to wait overnight in line to
    apply, as they were only going to take the first 50 applicants in line
    that had the correct background.  You will be seriously hampered without
    a degree.  Even though she had a B.S. in M.T. degree, she had to go back
    and take other courses to qualify for PA school, as some of her courses
    were taken too long ago (she’s 45 years old and in her second year and
    went to college in the early 70′s).

    I don’t think I’m wrong in saying that in science, credentials mean a
    LOT.  Rethink not finishing up your biology courses.  It might not have
    direct bearing, but if I were hiring and I had to pick between equally
    pleasant candidates, I would probably choose the degreed person.
    Sorry.  It shows you put in the time.  Science courses are like a
    gauntlet that you must run.  When you finish, people know what you’ve
    been through.  Everyone gets frustrated.  It’s probably better to get
    over your peevishness and do it.

    Judy Dilworth, M.T. (ASCP)
    Microbiology

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    Edward Dombrowski wrote:
    > Hello,     I was hoping if someone could give me some help or advice
    > on finding a job. I currently work as an assistant pathologist at a
    > local laboratory. I’m non-certified, and have learned by on-the-job
    > training under an experienced pathologist for the past 3 years. Since
    > I am not certified, I only work on "minor" specimens, while leaving
    > the more complex ones for the pathologists to do. My eventual goal is
    > to attend assistant pathology school, but until I get there, I want to
    > learn as much as I can, building my experience and knowledge while I
    > wait. To be accepted into the PA program, all schools require a BS
    > degree, which I don’t have. I am 32, and have a BA degree in
    > Philosophy and I am 1 year short of my BS in biology, but out of
    > frustration at the educational system for undergraduate school. I quit
    > my BS program and have not been to school for the past year. I know it
    > might seem easier to just go back to school and finish my last year,
    > but I don’t want spend more money just to sit in classes and be bored
    > learning what will have little bearing on what I truly want to do. I
    > now focus on my work, and I am serious about it to the point where I
    > study anatomy and pathology in my spare time if you can believe that.
    > I am hoping that my work experience at the lab combined with my prior
    > degree and desire will suffice for the lack of a BS degree. My problem
    > is that at my current job, I have "hit the wall" in terms of the
    > learning curve, and I am looking to expand my horizons. The lab I work
    > at rarely does autopsies, and this is where I want to move on to, so,
    > I am looking for a job as an autopsy assistant. I am single and have
    > no children, and would be willing to move anywhere in the country,
    > from Washington to Florida, from Maine to California, just to have a
    > job as one. I can pick and move in a few weeks notice. Money is not
    > important (as long as I can eat and have a roof over my head in a
    > fairly safe neighborhood), but gaining experience is. As you can see,
    > my desire and determination are quite strong, but I know the jobs are
    > few. I was wondering if anyone perhaps knows of any positions
    > available where a non-certified applicant would be considered, or if
    > anyone could give me any advice regarding my situation, and perhaps my
    > next step. Thanks in advance, Ed

  2. admin says:

    Ed,
     as a pathologist I hate to "rain on your parade" as it were…but the reality
    is, you will never get any farther if you don’t go back to university.  More
    hospitals that hire Pathology Assistants want people who have the training to
    do all aspects of work with Pathologists, that means complex specimens(-Not
    just biopsies-), Autopsies and medical photography. many places require not
    just BS in Biology with pathology Assistant training but Masters degree
    Pathology Assistant. If you just want to work in Autopsies you could try
    training as a Diener where you would work in Forensic pathology
    departments/Medical examiner offices or in Funeral homes.Of course this may be
    locale specific, the above is true for the East Coast. I do not know what is
    required for the West Coast or midwest for example. You might try the American
    Society of Clinical Pathology( they have a website) to see the alternative
    pathways available.
    MJRobinsonDO

  3. admin says:

    MRobin7403 wrote in message

    <20000210220633.22492.00002…@ng-cq1.aol.com>…

    >Ed,

    <snip>

    If you just want to work in Autopsies you could try

    >training as a Diener where you would work in Forensic pathology
    >departments/Medical examiner offices or in Funeral homes.
    >MJRobinsonDO

    Ed:

        I am not a lawyer.

        Before you consider a career as a diener, working for the government in
    Forensic Pathology, please know that by doing so, the dissections you will
    be assisting in are "forced" government dissections.  There is no consent by
    your victim or their family.  Know that some of these victims and family
    members will despise you for the rest of your life and theirs.

        As a government employee (agent), you will be required to take an oath
    swearing that you will uphold the constitutions (U.S. and state) and the
    laws.  The basic U.S. and state constitution, statute and administrative
    code books amount to about 400 volumes.  Will you know what is in them?  No
    lawyer knows them all.   If you don’t know what’s in them  how can you swear
    to uphold what’s in them and not violate what’s in them?

        If you do violate what’s in them (just one little sentence), one of
    these pissed off family members may be able to sue you in your personal
    capacity for violation of constitutional rights, and maybe press criminal
    charges for the same thing.  Remember, you can’t claim you didn’t know about
    the law; you took an oath to uphold them all.

        And the law claimed to have been violated may have nothing to do with
    the clinical aspects of actually performing the autopsy itself.

        Further, as a government agent, not only can you, personally, be sued
    for violating one of these laws, but if YOU see another government agent
    violate one which deprives a citizens of any little right and YOU don’t do
    something immediately to stop it, YOU are just as culpable as they and can
    still be sued.

        Here are just 5 of the thousands of Federal laws.  The first 3 are for
    law suits, the last two are criminal.  They are extremely broad and are
    designed to protect American citizens from government agents.  When you see
    the word "injure"; the first definition of "injure" in the legal
    dictionaries is to "deprive someone of their rights".  When you see the
    phrase "color of law" or "color of office", it means "government employee".

            Wayne

    CIVIL ACTIONS

    United States Code Title 42 Section 1983. Civil action for deprivation of
    rights

    Every person who, under color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom,
    or usage, of any State or Territory or the District of Columbia, subjects,
    or causes to be subjected, any citizen of the United States or other person
    within the jurisdiction thereof to the for an act deprivation of any rights,
    privileges, or immunities secured by the Constitution and laws, shall be
    liable to the party injured in an action at law, suit in equity, or other
    proper proceeding for redress, except that in any action brought against a
    judicial officer or omission taken in such officer’s judicial capacity,
    injunctive relief shall not be granted unless a declaratory decree was
    violated or declaratory relief was unavailable. For the purposes of this
    section, any Act of Congress applicable exclusively to the District of
    Columbia shall be considered to be a statute of the District of Columbia.

    United States Code Tile 42 Section. 1985. Conspiracy to interfere with civil
    rights

     (3) Depriving persons of rights or privileges

    If two or more persons in any State or Territory conspire or go in disguise
    on the highway or on the premises of another, for the purpose of depriving,
    either directly or indirectly, any person or class of persons of the equal
    protection of the laws, or of equal privileges and immunities under the
    laws; or for the purpose of preventing or hindering the constituted
    authorities of any State or Territory from giving or securing to all persons
    within such State or Territory the equal protection of the laws; or if two
    or more persons conspire to prevent by force, intimidation, or threat, any
    citizen who is lawfully entitled to vote, from giving his support or
    advocacy in a legal manner, toward or in favor of the election of any
    lawfully qualified person as an elector for President or Vice President, or
    as a Member of Congress of the United States; or to injure any citizen in
    person or property on account of such support or advocacy; in any case of
    conspiracy set forth in this section, if one or more persons engaged therein
    do, or cause to be done, any act in furtherance of the object of such
    conspiracy, whereby another is injured in his person or property, or
    deprived of having and exercising any right or privilege of a citizen of the
    United States, the party so injured or deprived may have an action for the
    recovery of damages occasioned by such injury or deprivation, against any
    one or more of the conspirators.

    United States Code, Title 42, Section 1986   Action for neglect to prevent

    Every person who, having knowledge that any of the wrongs conspired to be
    done, and mentioned in section 1985 of this title, are about to be
    committed, and having power to prevent or aid in preventing the commission
    of the same, neglects or refuses so to do, if such wrongful act be
    committed, shall be liable to the party injured, or his legal
    representatives, for all damages caused by such wrongful act, which such
    person by reasonable diligence could have prevented; and such damages may be
    recovered in an action on the case; and any number of persons guilty of such
    wrongful neglect or refusal may be joined as defendants in the action; and
    if the death of any party be caused by any such wrongful act and neglect,
    the legal representatives of the deceased shall have such action therefor,
    and may recover not exceeding $5,000 damages therein, for the benefit of the
    widow of the deceased, if there be one, and if there be no widow, then for
    the benefit of the next of kin of the deceased. But no action under the
    provisions of this section shall be sustained which is not commenced within
    one year after the cause of action has accrued.

    CRIMINAL ACTIONS

    United States Code Title 18 Section 241. Conspiracy against rights

    If two or more persons conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate
    any person in any State, Territory, Commonwealth, Possession, or District in
    the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him by
    the Constitution or laws of the United States, or because of his having so
    exercised the same; or
    If two or more persons go in disguise on the highway, or on the premises of
    another, with intent to prevent or hinder his free exercise or enjoyment of
    any right or privilege so secured –
    They shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten years,
    or both; and if death results from the acts committed in violation of this
    section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap,
    aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or
    an attempt to kill, they shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for
    any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.

    United States Code Title 18 Section 242. Deprivation of rights under color
    of law

    Whoever, under color of any law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom,
    willfully subjects any person in any State, Territory, Commonwealth,
    Possession, or District to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or
    immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United
    States, or to different punishments, pains, or penalties, on account of such
    person being an alien, or by reason of his color, or race, than are
    prescribed for the punishment of citizens, shall be fined under this title
    or imprisoned not more than one year, or both; and if bodily injury results
    from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include
    the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives,
    or fire, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten
    years, or both; and if death results from the acts committed in violation of
    this section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap,
    aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or
    an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any
    term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.

  4. admin says:

    Hi, Edward!
    I’m not the right person for your advise cause I also need an advise from you, if its possible.
    I’m currently doing a pathology course in Australia, and this is my last year.
    I would like to know if you can help me , finding a job, i will more than happy, I wouldn’t mind if I have to travel all the way to U.S.A , cause I’m 21yrs old and single .Thanks for your help.
    Gise
      Edward Dombrowski <calig…@surfsouth.com> wrote in message news:VyCo4.931$0p1.32777@news4.giganews.com…
      Hello,

          I was hoping if someone could give me some help or advice on finding a job. I currently work as an assistant pathologist at a local laboratory. I’m non-certified, and have learned by on-the-job training under an experienced pathologist for the past 3 years. Since I am not certified, I only work on "minor" specimens, while leaving the more complex ones for the pathologists to do. My eventual goal is to attend assistant pathology school, but until I get there, I want to learn as much as I can, building my experience and knowledge while I wait. To be accepted into the PA program, all schools require a BS degree, which I don’t have. I am 32, and have a BA degree in Philosophy and I am 1 year short of my BS in biology, but out of frustration at the educational system for undergraduate school. I quit my BS program and have not been to school for the past year. I know it might seem easier to just go back to school and finish my last year, but I don’t want spend more money just to sit in classes and be bored learning what will have little bearing on what I truly want to do. I now focus on my work, and I am serious about it to the point where I study anatomy and pathology in my spare time if you can believe that. I am hoping that my work experience at the lab combined with my prior degree and desire will suffice for the lack of a BS degree. My problem is that at my current job, I have "hit the wall" in terms of the learning curve, and I am looking to expand my horizons. The lab I work at rarely does autopsies, and this is where I want to move on to, so, I am looking for a job as an autopsy assistant. I am single and have no children, and would be willing to move anywhere in the country, from Washington to Florida, from Maine to California, just to have a job as one. I can pick and move in a few weeks notice. Money is not important (as long as I can eat and have a roof over my head in a fairly safe neighborhood), but gaining experience is. As you can see, my desire and determination are quite strong, but I know the jobs are few. I was wondering if anyone perhaps knows of any positions available where a non-certified applicant would be considered, or if anyone could give me any advice regarding my situation, and perhaps my next step. Thanks in advance,

      Ed

  5. admin says:

    >   Before you consider a career as a diener, working for the government in
    >Forensic Pathology, please know that by doing so, the dissections you will
    >be assisting in are "forced" government dissections.  

    Wayne,
      Whoa!! i have read a few other of your posts here about pathologists>>>>Do
    tell me why you are expressing so much hatred towards our porfession?? What
    have we ever done to you??? Pathology is an honored medical specialty and you
    are making it sound like we are Dr. Frankensteins out to dismember the
    populace.   I am not a forensic pathologist, howver not all forensic
    pathologists are slaves of the government. And those i know that do work for
    the government do not work for the feds but for the states or counties.   This
    people are underpaid and perform a useful service. Who else will tell the
    police the someone who they thought commited suicide was actually murdered??
    Who else is going to find the essential information needed to put a poisoner
    behind bars?? Who is going to tell the police that a little kid who supposedly
    dies in his sleep was actually shaken to death or abused???
    Please think about your rabid replies before you post them.

  6. admin says:

    Wayne

    Why was your daughter’s heart kept? was it to try to establish an exact
    cause of death – there are cardiomyopathies that are genetically predisposed
    and accurate classification can have serious implications for other family
    members.  I doubt the pathologist kept the heart "for kicks", interest,
    research or any other reason beyond carrying out the investigation into your
    daughter’s death in as comprehensive manner as possible

    Ivan.

  7. admin says:

    Ivan Robinson wrote in message <89g1i9$3q…@plutonium.btinternet.com>…
    >Wayne

    >Why was your daughter’s heart kept? was it to try to establish an exact
    >cause of death – there are cardiomyopathies that are genetically
    predisposed
    >and accurate classification can have serious implications for other family
    >members.  I doubt the pathologist kept the heart "for kicks", interest,
    >research or any other reason beyond carrying out the investigation into
    your
    >daughter’s death in as comprehensive manner as possible

    Hi Dr. Robinson:

        Good to hear from you again.  Hope everything is OK with the family and
    yourself.  How was that "holiday" last fall where you took the other Dr. to
    that most romantic of cities?

    Cardiomyopathies?  I work with a guy who’s son died about 5 weeks before my
    daughter died.  The 10 year old was out one Saturday afternoon playing
    sports and came home really tired.  He laid down early and died during the
    night.  The autopsy showed that he had a congenital heart defect that was
    hereitary.   A test allegedly showed that the condition was inherited from
    his mother’s side.  Allegedly ,medication given to the wife and siblings
    should prevent a reconnence in the family (I suppose along with medical
    maintenance).  Some Dr. asked if he could keep the son’s heart for
    "research".  The family agreed.

        In my state (and probably others, if not all) medical exaiminers /
    coroners cannot keep organs.  Had it been my child, I would not have allowed
    it, for any reason.  I would rather die myself, or see another die, than
    save my own hide at the expense of a child who has already suffered the most
    horrible thing in the universe, death; and the second most horrible thing in
    the universe, dissection; and the third most horrible thing in the universe,
    sexual mollestation.  I don’t think highly of this person for condeming his
    son to spend eternity without a heart.

        What made you think that the medical examiner / coroner kept my
    daughter’s heart?  My previous post?  I said  "Because of them my daughter’s
    heart is now a piece of garbage" I didn’t say he kept it.  What he did was
    cut out her heart, cut open her heart, cut out a piece of her heart, (said
    piece is now in a thin blue plastic cup with about 10 other pieces of my
    daughter, which I eventually expect to get back) throw what was left of her
    heart in a plastic trash bag, and shove the trash bag God knows where, into
    her mutilated body.  I expect he poured the very blood of her heart down the
    sewer.

            Wayne

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >Ivan.

  8. admin says:

    Wayne

    You are right – I jumped to the wrong conclusion, I thought the pathologist
    kept the heart v- apologies

    Ivan

  9. admin says:

    >Since you dissectionists know what you are doing is abnormal, as proven by
    >the fact that you will not allow family members to watch while you do it

    Wayne,
      I dont agree with you here.. If family members wish to observe an autopsy or
    have thier designated person watch the autopsy, I for one have no reason to
    keep them from performing this.  I do not keep people from observing a post. We
    allow medical students and other staff members observe autopsies as learning
    experiences. I would prefer that they do attend. Otherwise they will not learn
    from thier mistakes.  I am sorry you had such a bad experience with your
    daughters autopsy. I personally will not do an autopsy without appropriate
    consent. Who provided the consent for your daughter’s?  The appropriate consent
    is always next of kin. Husband if married, parent if not or borther or sister
    or child if parent not living and not married.  you would have to specify of
    course the circumstances behind the autopsy of course.  I expect because you
    are so agaisnt the governement, that it was an accidental death or perhaps a
    murder.  

  10. admin says:

    MRobin7403 wrote in message

    <20000306212433.02604.00000…@ng-fm1.aol.com>…

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >>Since you dissectionists know what you are doing is abnormal, as proven by
    >>the fact that you will not allow family members to watch while you do it

    >Wayne,
    >  I dont agree with you here.. If family members wish to observe an autopsy
    or
    >have thier designated person watch the autopsy, I for one have no reason to
    >keep them from performing this.  I do not keep people from observing a
    post. We
    >allow medical students and other staff members observe autopsies as
    learning
    >experiences. I would prefer that they do attend. Otherwise they will not
    learn
    >from thier mistakes.  I am sorry you had such a bad experience with your
    >daughters autopsy. I personally will not do an autopsy without appropriate
    >consent. Who provided the consent for your daughter’s?

    The government, always backed up by their ever present, if usually
    unnoticeable, guns.  It was a suicide.  I’ll let you know more after my
    court stuff is finished.  IMHO, they screwed up.

     The appropriate consent

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >is always next of kin. Husband if married, parent if not or borther or
    sister
    >or child if parent not living and not married.  you would have to specify
    of
    >course the circumstances behind the autopsy of course.  I expect because
    you
    >are so agaisnt the governement, that it was an accidental death or perhaps
    a
    >murder.

  11. admin says:

    >he government, always backed up by their ever present, if usually
    >unnoticeable, guns.  It was a suicide.  I’ll let you know more after my
    >court stuff is finished

    Wayne,
     I am sorry about the way your daughter died. There is absolutely nothing you
    could do…if she was a suicide, it is LAW that an autopsy is performed. You
    are bucking not only the state but I also believe Federal law.

    I hope you find relief in the result of your court case, but obviously the
    guilt is more than you can handle.
    I am sorry
    MJ

  12. admin says:

    MRobin7403 wrote in message

    <20000314225848.02157.00001…@ng-fe1.aol.com>…

    >>he government, always backed up by their ever present, if usually
    >>unnoticeable, guns.  It was a suicide.  I’ll let you know more after my
    >>court stuff is finished

    >Wayne,
    > I am sorry about the way your daughter died. There is absolutely nothing
    you
    >could do…if she was a suicide, it is LAW that an autopsy is performed.
    You
    >are bucking not only the state but I also believe Federal law.

    Actually, as far as I know, if the death happens in a state, only state law
    applies, except maybe in limited circumstances, like if you die on a
    military base, or trying to blow up a nuclear reactor, or some other thing
    that lets the Feds get jurisdiction.

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >I hope you find relief in the result of your court case, but obviously the
    >guilt is more than you can handle.
    >I am sorry
    >MJ

  13. admin says:

    A recent report on Job Satisfaction included the following:

    Federal workers who help explore space or protect the environment are among
    the most satisfied with their jobs, while those who enforce immigration and
    food safety rules are the least happy. Overall, 60% of federal employees say
    they are very or somewhat satisfied with their jobs, according to a US
    government survey released 31 March 2000. That compares with about 62% in
    similar private sector surveys, federal officials said. The highest
    satisfaction scores went to the National Aeronautics and Space
    Administration at 78%, even though it suffered numerous setbacks to its Mars
    program.
    <<<<<<<<<<

    Whatever job you chose, you are going to spend a lot of your waking hours
    doing it. Job satisfaction is *very* important, more so I would say than
    salary. The public image and perception of your job is an important part of
    job satisfaction.

    The postings of Wayne have suggested deep dissatisfaction with the fact that
    citizens do not have the freedom to opt out of autopsy. As people become
    more informed though the Internet and other public media this
    dissatisfaction amongst the public is very likely to grow, making people who
    perform autopsies unpopular and even regarded with more horror than they are
    now. It is as much the compulsion as the actual act that creates the
    revulsion.

    Of course much successful legal and scientific research is performed as a
    result of autopsies, and even if people did have the freedom  to opt out
    this would not change at all. [relatively few people would take the trouble
    to file the necessary forms etc.] Maybe some of those contemplating this as
    a career should consider improving the public image of the profession by
    campaigning in favour of allowing citizens the freedom to opt out.

    After all, citizens have to opt *in* to transplantation of organs after they
    have died, and in practical terms what is the difference between this and a
    full autopsy?


    Sincerely, John de Rivaz
    my homepage links to Longevity Report, Fractal Report, my singles club for
    people in Cornwall, music, Inventors’ report, an autobio and various other
    projects:       http://geocities.yahoo.com/longevityrpt

    Wayne <wlogs…@erols.com> wrote in message

    news:8c6f34$dhu$1@bob.news.rcn.net…

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > MRobin7403 wrote in message
    > <20000314225848.02157.00001…@ng-fe1.aol.com>…
    > >>he government, always backed up by their ever present, if usually
    > >>unnoticeable, guns.  It was a suicide.  I’ll let you know more after my
    > >>court stuff is finished

    > >Wayne,
    > > I am sorry about the way your daughter died. There is absolutely nothing
    > you
    > >could do…if she was a suicide, it is LAW that an autopsy is performed.
    > You
    > >are bucking not only the state but I also believe Federal law.

    > Actually, as far as I know, if the death happens in a state, only state
    law
    > applies, except maybe in limited circumstances, like if you die on a
    > military base, or trying to blow up a nuclear reactor, or some other thing
    > that lets the Feds get jurisdiction.

    > >I hope you find relief in the result of your court case, but obviously
    the
    > >guilt is more than you can handle.
    > >I am sorry
    > >MJ

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