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mercury poisoning from silver fillings

³For the past 150 years, deadly mercury vapors have been leeching from
dental silver amalgam fillings into the bodies of 85% of the western
population. Silver amalgam fillings are having a negative effect on the
mind, body, and spirit of much of humanity.²

   ­ Francene Lee, author, ³Toxic Teeth Toxic Body²

By now, you may have heard about the dangers associated with mercury
poisoning from   silver amalgam fillings. It is a great idea to free your
mouth from these toxic mercury fillings, however, you must follow the
correct precautions during this procedure.

 ³Toxic Teeth Toxic Body² is a patient¹s guide to mercury toxicity and
detoxification. It has been written to give you a clear pathway to the
safer removal of fillings from your teeth.  It presents the most recent
protocols and explains how to detoxify the entire body from mercury.

³Toxic Teeth Toxic Body² presents opinions on detoxification procedures
ranging from IV-chelation to homeopathics. The book is a self-published,
work-in-progress based on more than 10 years of research. However, it
already includes 60 pages of information to assist the patient as a manual
during the removal of fillings and follow-up detoxification process.

³Toxic Teeth Toxic Body² is available now. Use it, please!  It will save
you time, money, anxiety and perhaps your health.

Visit the web site to find out more about this book  
http://www.lainet.com/~stewart/mercury/

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posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (3)

3 Responses to “mercury poisoning from silver fillings”

  1. admin says:

    MARK ADKINS wrote:

    –[snip]–
    > Can you think of a substance
    > (a) be ototoxic; specifically, cause or exacerbate tinnitus
    > (b) may accumulate in the body or be slow to detoxify
    > (c) cause a metallic aftertaste which lasts for hours or is

    –[snip]–

    Might want to consider Salicylate Intoxication or Aspirin
    Hypersensitivity.  There are lots of over the counter drugs that contain
    salicylates (Pepto, Mg subslicylate, cough, cold, flu medicines, etc)
    Salicylate intoxication may start with only tinnitus as the only
    symptom.

    Hope this helps.
    TTYL

    John
    mailto:one…@post.its.mcw.edu

  2. admin says:

    In article <5ha8v3$…@news.asu.edu> emer…@aztec.asu.edu (MARK ADKINS) writes:
    >Can you think of a substance (including prescription drugs or
    >hormones) which would or could:

    >(a) be ototoxic; specifically, cause or exacerbate tinnitus

    >(b) may accumulate in the body or be slow to detoxify

    >(c) cause a metallic aftertaste which lasts for hours or is
    >constantly present; this effect would be most noticeable with
    >chronic exposure or with recontinuance of exposure after previous
    >chronic exposure.  

    Metronidazole, aka "Flagyl", a common anti anaerobic/protozoal
    antibiotic will certainly do C, Probably A as well, but sorry, it’s
    half life is only 7.5 hours, unmetabolized.

            -J. Grossman

  3. admin says:

     Well go question by question…………

    MARK ADKINS <emer…@aztec.asu.edu> wrote in article
    <5ha8v3$…@news.asu.edu>…

    > Can you think of a substance (including prescription drugs or
    > hormones) which would or could:

    > (a) be ototoxic; specifically, cause or exacerbate tinnitus

    –pretty much all of the aminoglycosides (gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin,
    netilmicin, etc.)  Note, these are usually or exclusively given IV
    –Vancomycin (can be used orally but absorption is horrible)
    –really, really high doses of penicillin, including the amino-cillins
    (amoxicillin, ampicillin).  We’re talking like ten grams ….. before
    tinnitus would set in.
    > (b) may accumulate in the body or be slow to detoxify

    –Thousands of drugs could come under this heading.
    –Notable examples:  THC (an accumulator), pentobarbital (its a IV general
    anesthetic), some benzodiazepines (Valium, Xanax, Dalmane, etc.  Most of
    the benzo’s have active metabolites that hang around for days, however
    their activity isn’t as great as the parent compound.)
    –A "general" rule is:  the more lipophilic (fat loving) the drug, the more
    it will deposit into fatty tissue, the longer it will stay in the body.

    > (c) cause a metallic aftertaste which lasts for hours or is
    > constantly present; this effect would be most noticeable with
    > chronic exposure or with recontinuance of exposure after previous
    > chronic exposure.

    –I don’t know about the chronic exposer part but….
    metronidazole (Flagyl), and clarithromycin (Biaxin) both of which are
    antibiotics can cause a metalic taste.

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > Your assistance appreciated.
    > —
    > "Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain."

    > Mark Adkins (emer…@aztec.asu.edu)