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Should one stop using cortisone nasal spray during a common cold? And, new medicines for the common cold.

In looking at the Medscape article

http://www.medscape.com/medscape/cno/1999/flu/Story.cfm?story_id=999

One sees some new medicines being tested which have shown promise in
combating the cold virus. Does anyone know if any of these medicines are
available yet?

Also, or those of us who regularly use cortisone nasal spray for nasal
rhinitis, this article makes one wonder whether one should stop using that
spray when one has a cold. Here is a relevant quote:

<<Recently, the role of intranasal fluticasone has been investigated in a
large number of patients with the common cold. By various methods, a virus
infection was confirmed in approximately 75% of cases. In terms of symptom
evolution, no clinical benefit was observed between placebo recipients and
fluticasone-treated patients. An intriguing observation was that fluticasone
treatment was associated with prolonged viral shedding, suggesting that
corticosteroids may boost viral replication.>>

Would doctors suggest that these sprays not be used when one is infected
with a cold?

.
posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (8)

8 Responses to “Should one stop using cortisone nasal spray during a common cold? And, new medicines for the common cold.”

  1. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    MS wrote:

    > In looking at the Medscape article

    > http://www.medscape.com/medscape/cno/1999/flu/Story.cfm?story_id=999

    > One sees some new medicines being tested which have shown promise in
    > combating the cold virus. Does anyone know if any of these medicines are
    > available yet?

    > Also, or those of us who regularly use cortisone nasal spray for nasal
    > rhinitis, this article makes one wonder whether one should stop using that
    > spray when one has a cold. Here is a relevant quote:

    > <<Recently, the role of intranasal fluticasone has been investigated in a
    > large number of patients with the common cold. By various methods, a virus
    > infection was confirmed in approximately 75% of cases. In terms of symptom
    > evolution, no clinical benefit was observed between placebo recipients and
    > fluticasone-treated patients. An intriguing observation was that fluticasone
    > treatment was associated with prolonged viral shedding, suggesting that
    > corticosteroids may boost viral replication.>>

    > Would doctors suggest that these sprays not be used when one is infected
    > with a cold?

    I asked my ENT about this.  He sees no problem with using the steroid
    nasal sprays with a viral common cold.

    It is known that increased viral shedding also occurs when taking
    aspirin, yet countless cold sufferers have taken aspirin and the cold
    disappeared promptly anyway.  


    Steven D. Litvintchouk                  
    Email:  s…@mitre.org                
    Disclaimer:  As far as I am aware, the opinions expressed
    herein            
    are not those of my employer.

  2. admin says:

    "Steven D. Litvintchouk" <s…@mitre.org> wrote in message
    news:3A745AA4.76EE590C@mitre.org…

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > MS wrote:

    > > In looking at the Medscape article

    > > http://www.medscape.com/medscape/cno/1999/flu/Story.cfm?story_id=999

    > > One sees some new medicines being tested which have shown promise in
    > > combating the cold virus. Does anyone know if any of these medicines are
    > > available yet?

    > > Also, or those of us who regularly use cortisone nasal spray for nasal
    > > rhinitis, this article makes one wonder whether one should stop using
    that
    > > spray when one has a cold. Here is a relevant quote:

    > > <<Recently, the role of intranasal fluticasone has been investigated in
    a
    > > large number of patients with the common cold. By various methods, a
    virus
    > > infection was confirmed in approximately 75% of cases. In terms of
    symptom
    > > evolution, no clinical benefit was observed between placebo recipients
    and
    > > fluticasone-treated patients. An intriguing observation was that
    fluticasone
    > > treatment was associated with prolonged viral shedding, suggesting that
    > > corticosteroids may boost viral replication.>>

    > > Would doctors suggest that these sprays not be used when one is infected
    > > with a cold?

    > I asked my ENT about this.  He sees no problem with using the steroid
    > nasal sprays with a viral common cold.

    Is he aware of this research?

    > It is known that increased viral shedding also occurs when taking
    > aspirin, yet countless cold sufferers have taken aspirin and the cold
    > disappeared promptly anyway.

    With some of us, colds never disappear promptly!

  3. admin says:

    On Sun, 28 Jan 2001 06:05:30 -0800, "              MS" <m…@nospam.com>
    wrote:

    >In looking at the Medscape article

    >http://www.medscape.com/medscape/cno/1999/flu/Story.cfm?story_id=999

    >One sees some new medicines being tested which have shown promise in
    >combating the cold virus. Does anyone know if any of these medicines are
    >available yet?

    Pleconaril has been used recently in IV form to treat meningitis
    caused by enteroviruses, cousins of the cold viruses. It has been
    shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization. It is not yet
    available for outpatient treatment of the common cold, but it is
    coming soon.

    >Also, or those of us who regularly use cortisone nasal spray for nasal
    >rhinitis, this article makes one wonder whether one should stop using that
    >spray when one has a cold. Here is a relevant quote:

    ><<Recently, the role of intranasal fluticasone has been investigated in a
    >large number of patients with the common cold. By various methods, a virus
    >infection was confirmed in approximately 75% of cases. In terms of symptom
    >evolution, no clinical benefit was observed between placebo recipients and
    >fluticasone-treated patients. An intriguing observation was that fluticasone
    >treatment was associated with prolonged viral shedding, suggesting that
    >corticosteroids may boost viral replication.>>

    >Would doctors suggest that these sprays not be used when one is infected
    >with a cold?

    You may have noticed that in the direct-to-consumer marketing ads for
    intranasal steroids, one of the side effects mentioned is "viral
    infection." Obviously, the infection is not a true side effect, since
    the virus is not in the nasal spray, but what they mean is that you
    may be a bit more susceptible. This is understandable, since
    corticosteroids suppress T-cell immunity locally. However, whether you
    should stop when you have a cold is an individual matter. Some people
    who are prone to sinusitis may benefit from the continued reduction in
    mucosal swelling that the steroids provide, so that they are less
    likely to clog up the sinuses and end up with a secondary bacterial
    infection.

    PF

  4. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    PF Riley wrote:

    > On Sun, 28 Jan 2001 06:05:30 -0800, "              MS" <m…@nospam.com>
    > wrote:

    > >In looking at the Medscape article

    > >http://www.medscape.com/medscape/cno/1999/flu/Story.cfm?story_id=999

    > >One sees some new medicines being tested which have shown promise in
    > >combating the cold virus. Does anyone know if any of these medicines are
    > >available yet?

    > Pleconaril has been used recently in IV form to treat meningitis
    > caused by enteroviruses, cousins of the cold viruses. It has been
    > shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization. It is not yet
    > available for outpatient treatment of the common cold, but it is
    > coming soon.

    I’ve had my eye on the developer,
    http://www.viropharma.com
    According to their info, pleconaril actually has been more effective
    against the common cold than against meningitis.


    Steven D. Litvintchouk                  
    Email:  s…@mitre.org                
    Disclaimer:  As far as I am aware, the opinions expressed
    herein            
    are not those of my employer.

  5. admin says:

    "PF Riley" <pfri…@watt-not.com> wrote in message

    news:3a7469c1.49687018@news.nwlink.com…

    > Pleconaril has been used recently in IV form to treat meningitis
    > caused by enteroviruses, cousins of the cold viruses. It has been
    > shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization. It is not yet
    > available for outpatient treatment of the common cold, but it is
    > coming soon.

    Are there any clinical trials of it, that one could perhaps get into?

  6. admin says:

    MS wrote:

    > "PF Riley" <pfri…@watt-not.com> wrote in message
    > news:3a7469c1.49687018@news.nwlink.com…

    > > Pleconaril has been used recently in IV form to treat meningitis
    > > caused by enteroviruses, cousins of the cold viruses. It has been
    > > shown to reduce the duration of hospitalization. It is not yet
    > > available for outpatient treatment of the common cold, but it is
    > > coming soon.

    > Are there any clinical trials of it, that one could perhaps get into?

    See their website at
    http://www.viropharma.com


    Steven D. Litvintchouk                  
    Email:  s…@mitre.org                
    Disclaimer:  As far as I am aware, the opinions expressed
    herein            
    are not those of my employer.

  7. admin says:

    > I asked my ENT about this.  He sees no problem with using the steroid
    > nasal sprays with a viral common cold.

    It may not be a problem but does it do any good? When I get a cold I’m
    so stuffed up the spray seems like it doesn’t go anywhere and then just
    gets blown out with one of endless rounds of nose blowing. Seems like
    it’s a waste of an expensive prescription to use it with a cold.

  8. admin says:

    "Steven D. Litvintchouk" <s…@mitre.org> wrote in message
    news:3A745AA4.76EE590C@mitre.org…

    > It is known that increased viral shedding also occurs when taking
    > aspirin, yet countless cold sufferers have taken aspirin and the cold
    > disappeared promptly anyway.

    Is that only true for aspirin, or for all NSAIDS (Ibuprofen, etc.)?

    Thanks,
    Mike